Updated genoa cars, steam-bending teak, refurbishing the water tanks

New towable ball-bearing genoa cars that can be adjusted from the cockpit and under load.  These Garhauer units are custom fabricated to fit the existing T-track.

New towable ball-bearing genoa cars that can be adjusted from the cockpit and under load. These Garhauer units are custom fabricated to fit the existing T-track.

The teak toe rail on the transom is almost weathered away. It needs to be replaced.

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This is a section of the old toe rail compared to the new. I’ll modify the profile on a router table to make them match more closely.

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That’s better. Probably a bit beefier than the unweathered original.

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But the old one was steam-bent to fit the curve of the transom.

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So we need to make a steambox. Pretty easy. Done using PVC tubing I had on hand plus a 1000W electric kettle ($5 at Salvation Army Store). All it needed was a little modification with a utility knife and file to make it fit a PVC street elbow.

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Its tilted so that condensate will restock the pot – it needs to last for 40 minutes before boiling dry, based on the thickness of the teak. Removed the thermostat from the kettle so we get the full 1000W 100% of the time. Also surrounded the PVC tube with pipe insulation and bubble wrap so it will achieve the full 212 deg. all along the length.

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I need to get the hot piece into this form within seconds of removal from the steambox.

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Temperature gauge shows 212 deg. at the far end: start the timer!

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Pot ran dry at exactly 40 min. Slapped it in the form and applied the clamps. I’ll let it sit here for a few days before removing. There will be some snap-back so I made the form more curved than what’s desired. (Old piece laid on top for comparison.)

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Here’s the piece sitting on the transom. Degree of curvature is pretty near perfect.

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Our galvanized water tanks had rust in their narrow bottoms where the undrainable last gallon would sit year after year. This was causing a bit of rust to show up in the pumpout; no perforation of the tanks had occurred. To deal with this the rust was removed using a chelating agent called Evapo-Rust. The interior was then etched with muriatic acid, rinsed, dried, and coated with 3M Scotchkote Liquid Epoxy Coating 323. This is a product designed to create potable water tanks within the weldments of ships. It is certified to ANSI/NSF Standard 61, Drinking Water System Components. Its the bright green stuff.

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When first registering the boat, the State of Illinois wanted the hull number. Search as I might, I never could find it. But here it is in the aft lazarette. You have to actually be inside to see it. (If I was one inch taller I’d never have made it.) Had to crawl in here to unbolt the taffrail, stern cleats, etc. to clear the aft deck for painting.

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